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Dendritic Spine Shape Classification from Two-Photon Microscopy Images
Authors: Muhammad Usman Ghani, Sümeyra Demir Kanık, Ali Özgür Argunsah, Tolga Tasdizen, Devrim Ünay, Müjdat Çetin
Published in: SIU 2015
Publication year: 2015
Abstract: Functional properties of a neuron are coupled with its morphology, particularly the morphology of dendritic spines. Spine volume has been used as the primary morphological parameter in order the characterize the structure and function coupling. However, this reductionist approach neglects the rich shape repertoire of dendritic spines. First step to incorporate spine shape information into functional coupling is classifying main spine shapes that were proposed in the literature. Due to the lack of reliable and fully automatic tools to analyze the morphology of the spines, such analysis is often performed manually, which is a laborious and time intensive task and prone to subjectivity. In this paper we present an automated approach to extract features using basic image processing techniques, and classify spines into mushroom or stubby by applying machine learning algorithms. Out of 50 manually segmented mushroom and stubby spines, Support Vector Machine was able to classify 98% of the spines correctly.
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